Ulva
This website provides a list of Chinese language forms of British place names. See below for an explanation of how Chinese language equivalent names are formed. NOTE. It is essential that you double-check information here with other sources. We are always open to receiving new or different translations and usages.

IMPORTANT. The Chinese characters provided assume a Mandarin language (普通话 / 普通話) pronunciation, see the pinyin (拼音) supplied. A Cantonese language (广东话 / 廣東話) reader would read the Chinese characters very differently in many cases, and the sounds would not match the English way of saying the name.

UK Place Simp. Chinese Trad. Chinese Translation PinYin pronounciation
Oxford 牛津 牛津 ox ford Niú jīn
Lake District 湖区 湖區 lake district Húqū
[type 1]. These are straight translations from the UK name. There are comparitively few cases where this is appropriate. For example, the town of Bath could be translated literally, but this could lead to confusion. After all, we recognise the difference between the place 'Bath' and the word 'bath' by using a Capital letter. There is no equivalent within written Chinese.
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York 约克 约克 none Yuē kè
Inverness 因佛内斯 因佛內斯 none Yīn fú nèi sī
[type 2]. These are phonetic translations of the UK name. This is the most common form used. Most of the Chinese characters have some meaning in translation, but it is obvious to the Chinese reader from the nonsensical combination of characters that a phonetic meaning is intended.
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England 英格兰 英格蘭 英 can mean 'brave' Yīng gé lán
Edinburgh 爱丁堡 愛丁堡 爱 can mean 'to love',堡 can mean 'castle' Àidīngbǎo
[type 3]. These are phonetic translations of the UK name, but one or more characters have been chosen to be flattering, or at least to avoid rudeness.So here the first part of the word is sounded as 'Ying' for the 'Eng' sound of England. However Mandarin Chinese has many characters which sound as 'Ying', and each has a different meaning. The choice of the character 英, which can mean 'brave', is obviously one that is positive for the British self-image. Certainly better than 萤, also sounded as Ying, which means 'glow worm'.
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